How Do I Make Sure My Rims Will Fit?

What size rim do I need?

Tire widths for a wheel/rim size chart – Equivalency tableRim width (inch)Min.

tire width (mm)Max.

tire width (mm)Rim width (inch)Min.

tire width (mm)Max.

tire width (mm)7,52052358,02152458,522525513 more rows.

Can you put wider tires on the same rim?

To keep the suspension and speedometer functioning correctly, both the stock diameter and width of the wheels and tires needs to be maintained. As a general rule of thumb, it’s safe to fit a tire up to 20 millimeters wider than stock on the original rim.

Can I replace 15 inch wheels with 16 inch?

Yes that’s perfectly fine it’s only plus you could go up to 17 inches easily. Though you have have sights wider tyres and sights lower ratio tyres so for 15 in to 16 in. … The less simple answer is “Yes, but the tires should be as close as possible to the same diameter as the ones that were on the smaller rims”.

Can I use 235 tires instead of 225?

Obviously, you will need a certain kind of tire depending on how you use your vehicle. Due to this, a 235 tire might not be better than a 225 tire, or vice versa, but depending on your situation, one tire might serve you better than the other.

How do I know if my alloy wheels will fit?

There are 10 aspects that are critical for your choice of alloy wheel to fit properly:The Wheel PCD (Pitch Circle Diameter / Stud Pattern)The Front and Rear Wheel Offset (ET)The Wheel Diameter.The Front and Rear Wheel Width/s.The Front and Rear Tyre Size.The Wheel Load Capabilities.The Tyre Load Index.The Centre Bore.More items…

Can I change tire size without changing rims?

It’s possible to change the size of your tires without actually changing the diameter. One example is if you want larger rims – you can buy tires that compensate for the larger rims by reducing the “height” of the outer tire.

Can I put alloy wheels on my car?

Every vehicle has a compatible rim width range (not a fixed width). For example: Audi A3 2002 has an offset range between 6J and 8.5J, as long as the rim width is within that range, the alloy wheels will be fully compatible. … The higher the offset is, then the further in the alloy wheel will sit on the vehicle.

Can I put 245 tires on 225 rims?

Can you put 245 tires on 225 rims? … As long as both of tires have the same diameter, you can use them. In this case the diameter is 18 for both.

Can I replace 15 inch wheels with 17 inch?

A 185/70R15 tire has an overall diameter (wheel + tire) of 15 + (2 x 5.3) = 25.6 inches. If you want to install 17-inch wheels, you will have to use a tire with a smaller height in order to maintain an overall (wheel + tire) diameter close to 25.6 inches. … So the tire you want for your new 17-inch wheels is a 205/50R17.

Can I use 225 tires instead of 215?

Unless you’re exploring the limits of the car’s performance, most drivers probably wouldn’t notice a difference between a 225 and a 215, all else being equal. If the outer circumference is a little different, the speedo may be a tiny bit off.

Can any tire fit on any rim?

Wheels and tires are not interchangeable words. Tires are a part of the wheel setup. For instance, your vehicle has a set size of rims, but you can buy different sizes of tires to fit those rims, as long as the middle of the tires is the correct size.

Can I put 265 tires on 245 rims?

Yes, but only if certain criteria are met. Both tires on the same axle have to be the same size tire. … IF you have 4 Wheel Drive or All Wheel Drive you have to buy 4 new 265 tires. The 265 tire diameter has to be the same as the 245 tire diameter.

Are all 5 lug rims the same?

The hub lug bolt pattern will be determined by the number of lug bolts and the distance between the opposing hub bolt (see 4-lug hub diagram). All but 5-lug patterns are measured in this manner. If your trailer wheel hubs have 5 lug bolts, measuring is slightly different. … Be sure that you skip one bolt when measuring.

What is my wheel offset?

The offset of a wheel is what locates the tyre and wheel/rim assembly in relation to the suspension. More specifically, it’s the measured distance between the mounting pad (the mounting surface of the wheel) and the center line of the rim. Sometimes It’s used interchangeably with the term “backspace”.