Quick Answer: Which Frequency Should You Monitor For Local Aerodrome Traffic?

What frequency do pilots use?

If you wish to talk to the pilot of another airplane, use the air-to-air frequency of 122.75 MHz..

Where is my CTAF frequency?

Notice next to the Unicom frequency there is a letter C inside a filled-in magenta circle. That letter C stands for CTAF. It means Unicom frequency 122.8 is the CTAF.

Why is niner not nine?

“Tree” for instance, means three, “fife” is the number five and “niner” means nine, says Tom Zecha, a manager at AOPA. The variations stemmed from a desire to avoid confusion between similar-sounding numbers, he says.

What does Niner niner zero mean?

9=niner (makes a two syllable word to make it different than fife) 0=zero or null (depending on the context)

Why do pilots say heavy?

The word “heavy” means a larger aircraft type, with a Maximum Takeoff Weight of 160 tonnes or more. These aircraft create wake turbulence from their wings and require extra separation between following aircraft, and the use of “heavy” reminds other pilots of that fact.

What is Unicom frequency used for?

UNICOM is a nongovernment air/ground radio communication station which may provide airport information at public use airports where there is no tower or FSS. On pilot request, UNICOM stations may provide pilots with weather information, wind direction, the recommended runway, or other necessary information.

What does ATF stand for in aviation?

Aerodrome Traffic FrequencyAerodrome Traffic Frequency (ATF) – SKYbrary Aviation Safety.

Is 121.5 still monitored?

DOES ANYONE STILL MONITOR 121.5 MHZ ELTS? Even though satellites no longer monitor 121.5 MHz signals, the search and rescue community will still respond when notified through other means. ELTs were originally intended to use 121.5 MHz to inform air traffic control and pilots monitoring the frequency of an emergency.

Why do pilots say Roger?

Before voice communication, pilots used morse code and instead of tapping out that a message was “received” they used shorthand and just tapped out “r” (short long short). … But just saying “r” could lead to communication errors. So they took “Roger” from the U.S. phonetic alphabet.